Dr Lily Tomas and Greg de Jong © 2015| Privacy Policy

 
 
 

Coeliac Disease

 

Coeliac Disease is a genetic food allergy in which the small intestine does not tolerate gluten (wheat protein). As it is a genetic disorder, once diagnosed the intolerance will continue for life.

 

Left untreated, coeliac disease will affect gut permeability leading to ‘Leaky Gut’ and imbalances in gut function. People with Coeliac should also be aware of the risk of mineral imbalances such as Vitamin B12, iron and calcium deficiency.

 

Although most individuals with coeliac disease present with gastrointestinal disturbances, they may also be deceptively free from such symptoms, presenting instead with a wide variety of symptoms including osteoporosis and non-specific low back pain. For this reason, an undiagnosed coeliac may persist for decades and be overlooked.

 

It is also important to know that there are many individuals who simply cannot tolerate gluten but do not have coeliac disease. Although avoidance is not essential, these individuals will choose to do so as they feel so much better without gluten in their diet.

 

What about Coeliac Diet?

 

Gluten avoidance is vital. Gluten is in wheat, but also in oats, rye, barley and, as a result, many processed foods. As wheat extracts including the sugar dextrose are in many foods, choice of commercial foods can be complicated. Nutrient supplements and pharmaceutical medications may also contain gluten.

 

A growing range of coeliac products and cook books are available to help you with the difficult task of planning a Healthy Coeliac Eating Plan. However, you should also remember that a Paleolithic style diet as represented by the Diabetes Healthy Eating Plan has no gluten foods (if you choose only natural ingredients) and may be easier than the complicated shop and cook guidelines created by the pursuit of replacement products.

 

What should you do when you are first diagnosed?

 

Undergo the complete gut programme outlined in the introduction to Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Disease.

 

It is likely that if you have had undiagnosed gluten intolerance, then micro-organism imbalances, leaky gut and other food intolerances may co-exist and need to be identified and treated.

 

One important concept to remember is that whilst coeliac disease is permanent, many of the coexisting food intolerances may only be present due to the leaky gut caused by CD. Thus, not all of your symptoms may in fact be due to CD and can be treated. Rebalance your gastrointestinal system and your diet may not need to permanently exclude many of the non-gluten foods you initially identify as problems.

 

What should you do when you are first diagnosed?

 

Undergo the complete gut programme outlined in the introduction to Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Disease.

 

It is likely that if you have had undiagnosed gluten intolerance, then micro-organism imbalances, leaky gut and other food intolerances may co-exist and need to be identified and treated.

 

One important concept to remember is that whilst coeliac disease is permanent, many of the coexisting food intolerances may only be present due to the leaky gut caused by CD. Thus, not all of your symptoms may in fact be due to CD and can be treated. Rebalance your gastrointestinal system and your diet may not need to permanently exclude many of the non-gluten foods you initially identify as problems.

 

Are there any other supplements you should consider?

 

We advise using an high quality high dose multivitamin and mineral formula on an ongoing basis to overcome the potential for long term nutrient deficiency.